Case definition for Ebola or Marburg Virus Diseases

Case definition for Ebola or Marburg Virus Diseases

The Ebola HF outbreak still ongoing and daily cases still recorded with almost 60% mortality of the infected cases in the following we will re-publish the case definition for Ebola or Marburg diseases as of 9 April 2014 from WHO recommendations the case definitions can be changed and will be updated automatically you can also review, Ebola: what should Clinicians Know? and you can help people as WHO is Calling for Infection Prevention and Control (IPC) Specialist

Case definition for Ebola or Marburg Virus Diseases

Case definition for Ebola or Marburg Virus Diseases

 

1. Routine surveillance: standard case definition recommended by WHO-AFRO for the notification of Ebola or Marburg cases

 

Suspected Ebola / Marburg cases for routine surveillance:

Illness with onset of fever and no response to treatment for usual causes of fever in the affected area, and at least one of the following signs:

Bloody diarrhea, bleeding from gums, bleeding into skin (purpura), bleeding into eyes and the urine.

 

Confirmed Ebola / Marburg cases for routine surveillance:

A suspected case with laboratory confirmation (+VE IgM antibody, +VE viral isolation or PCR)

 

2. Community – based surveillance:

 

Alert case:

Illness with onset of fever and no response to treatment of usual causes of fever in the area, OR at least one of the following signs:

Bleeding, bloody diarrhea, bleeding into urine OR any sudden death

 

3. During an Ebola or Marburg outbreak: case definitions used by the surveillance

 

3a. Case definition to be used by mobile teams or health stations and health centers

SUSPECTED CASE:

Any person, alive or dead, suffering or having suffered from a sudden onset of high fever and having had contact with:

– Suspected, probable or confirmed Ebola or Marburg case;

– Dead or sick animal (for Ebola)

– Mine (for Marburg)

 

OR: Sudden onset of high fever and at least three of the following symptoms:

• Headaches • vomiting • anorexia / loss of appetite • diarrhea • lethargy • stomach pain

• aching muscles or joints • difficulty swallowing • breathing difficulties • hiccup

 

OR: inexplicable bleeding

 

OR: any sudden, inexplicable death.

 

3b. Case definition for exclusive use by hospitals and surveillance teams

 

PROBABLE CASE:

Case suspected by clinician evaluated.

 

OR: Any deceased suspected case (where it has not been possible to collect specimens for laboratory confirmation) having an epidemiological link with a confirmed case

 

LABORATORY CONFIRMED CASE:

Any suspected or probable cases with a positive laboratory findings must test positive for the virus antigen, by detection of virus RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR), or by detection of IgM antibodies directed against Marburg or Ebola.

 

NON-CASE: Any case with a negative lab result.

 

 

4. Standard definition for contacts persons of Ebola or Marburg cases

 

Ebola or Marburg case contacts:

Person contacted with an Ebola / Marburg in the 21 days preceding the onset of symptoms in at least one of the following ways:

 sleep in the same household with a case

 had direct physical contact with the case (dead or alive) during the illness

 had direct physical contact with the (dead) case at the funeral,

 touched blood or body fluids of a patient during the illness

 touched his/her clothes or linens

 been breastfed by the patient (baby)

 

Contacts of dead or sick animals:

21 days preceding the symptoms in at least one of the following ways:

 Contact with the animal

 Contact with the animal’s blood / body fluids

 carved up the animal

 eaten raw bush-meat

 

Laboratory contacts:

21 days preceding the symptoms in at least one of the following ways:

 Contact with collected specimens from suspected Ebola / Marburg patients

 Contact with collected specimens from suspected Ebola / Marburg animal cases

 

Remember infection risk factors include: contact with the hospital where Ebola or Marburg cases are being treated, infection or vaccination in the 21 days preceding the onset of symptoms.

 

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